virtual training


Available 2022

These trainings are for aspiring facilitators, including volunteers, who can work with community-based agencies that provide restorative services for responsible youth and impacted parties. They include interactive learning and role-playing, allowing participants to practice how to facilitate basic diversion or court-referred cases involving youth who have caused harm, victimized parties, family members, and support people. 

Restorative Justice Training Schedule

 

Course Name

Dates

Hours in Class

Assignment Hours

Total Hours

Time of Day

(Fridays only)

Fee

Max Total Participants

Prerequisite

Youth Mediation

3/11-4/1

8 & 2 in small groups

8

18

9am-11am

$175

20

none

Truancy Mediation

4/8

2

2

4

9am-11am

$50

20

Youth Mediation

Restorative Conferencing

4/22-5/13

8

7

15

9am-11am

$150

20

RJ Familiarity

Peer Accountability Circles

6/3-6/24

8

7

15

9am-11am

$150

20

none

Family Group Conferencing

7/15-8/5

8

7

15

9am-11am

$150

20

RJ Familiarity

Youth Mediation

8/19 – 9/9

8 & 2 in small groups

8

18

9am-11am

$175

20

none

Truancy Mediation

9/16

2

2

4

9am-11am

$50

20

Youth Mediation

Program Definitions:

Youth Mediation: A private, informal meeting between youth and peers, family members, teachers and others to resolve disputes facilitated by a neutral third party. During mediation, youth are encouraged to communicate their concerns, listen to the other people’s concerns, identify needs and interests, offer solutions, and negotiate an agreement. The process provides youth an opportunity to learn communication skills, problem-solving skills, self-advocacy, and empathy.

Truancy Mediation: A private, informal meeting between youth, parent(s), school representatives and others to discuss and address school attendance issues, including the impacts on all of those affected, with the goal of developing a mutually agreeable plan to address the truancy issues. Truancy is often an indicator of other problems the youth might be having at home or school and is often a precursor to future undisciplined and delinquent behavior. 

Restorative Conferencing: (includes Victim-Youth Conferencing) A structured meeting led by a trained facilitator between youth who committed an offense (caused harm) and victim(s) of the offense (those who were harmed), and sometimes family, friends and community members. During the conference, youth hear the impact of their behavior on others, take responsibility for their actions, and work with the victim and other participants to develop a reparation agreement to repair the harm. The reparation agreement may include restitution, community service, and apology, as well as services to address needs of the youth that may have contributed to the harmful behavior. The process provides youth an opportunity to learn communication skills, problem-solving skills, self-advocacy, and empathy, as well as an opportunity to make things right and regain a positive place in the community. By facing the full human impact of the harm done, the youth hear first-hand the depth of the impact experienced by those most affected.

Peer Accountability Circles: (aka Sentencing Circles) A peer justice process to develop a plan of action that addresses concerns of interested parties, to address underlying causes of harmful behavior, while building a sense of community and its capacity for promoting and sharing common values. PA Circles provide an opportunity for the youth who caused harm to see first-hand the direct and indirect injuries caused by the offense, and the reasons for the limits of social tolerance. Moreover, the youth is provided with a constructive, proactive means of repairing the harm caused. The emphasis of PA Circles is not on punishment nor on rehabilitation; rather, it is on accountability.

Family Group Conferencing: A family-centered meeting to build partnerships within and around families to protect and support youth and other family members and advance their well-being. Agencies and community groups collaborate around critical family issues such as delinquency, run-a-way, substance use, family violence, family property damage or larceny, placement, and re-entry, to develop a plan to address these issue(s). The process is designed to create a forum in which families have a meaningful voice; emphasis is given to preparing family group members and professionals, weighting conference participation toward the family, respecting the culture of the family, and ensuring timely approval and implementation of agreed-upon plans. A family may also be a group home, foster care home, or other non-traditional homes.

Restorative Trainings

These trainings are for aspiring facilitators, including volunteers, who can work with community-based agencies that provide restorative services for responsible youth and impacted parties.  It includes interactive learning and role-playing allowing participants to practice how to facilitate basic diversion or court-referred cases involving youth who have caused harm, parties that have been harmed, family members, and support people.